Monday, May 14, 2012

Ugg!

So I was going to do a quick little post this morning on how I had tried to braid my garlic...

How I had planted some ginger root, repotted my mint and worked a bit on the bread bowl (still not enough going on to take pictures) and then I went out this morning...
I think once you have been around your animals for a while,  you know when something is wrong or different and I knew the minute I went out the door. I don't know how I knew or what exactly was wrong. It might have been because the pigs didn't woof at me like they always do. The chickens were quite but the pigs made no sound. I went to them first to see what was wrong. I always have the fear of them getting out. They were out alright but not completely. They had gotten though the weak spot in the fence to the chickens pen. What a relief! They were in the chicken pen but they at least weren't loose! I had leaned a pallet up against that weak spot between the pens and they had never bothered it before but it rained good last night and softened up the soil for them and they toppled the pallet and broke through the fence into the chicken pen. I have three large pens all are connected. They also were not interested in eating the chickens which was also a plus.
So I lured them back into their pen. It was pretty easy. They, of course, wanted that food. Then I set to work fixing the fence. I wired it together better and then put the pallet against it and wired the pallet to the fence....but...the pallet wasn't quite big enough and one of the pigs went around and broke just a little spot on the other side and went through again. I go in the chicken pen and try to get him to go back through the hole. He pays me little or no attention. I try luring with food but he has already eaten and wants to root in the chicken pen more. I ran in the house and got the duck eggs. My pigs LOVE eggs. He fell for it and squeezed back through the little hole (you would have never guessed that huge pig would fit!). I set to work wiring that hole closed then went and dragged another pallet from the house and wired it on the chicken pen side over that hole. I have checked on them a few times since and it seems to be holding but they like that chicken pen and they are steadily trying the fence on that side and I have also seen them now trying the fence on the duck pen side so I don't doubt that they will find a way out again. I think I will call Phil and have him bring home another pallet or two. 
I didn't even mention the chickens getting out while I was trying to put the pallet in or the fact that the septic is stopped up so I had the pleasure of washing my hair in cold water in the outdoor sink this morning( I did sponge bathe in the house, of course).
Sigh, it is going to be another long week.

17 comments:

  1. Oh, Becky... what a morning! I know exactly what you mean bout KNOWING when something is up with the animals as soon as you set foot outside... it's not a good feeling! Hope those pigs stay put and you can get your septic repaired soon... do you just get it pumped out? Is the field not percolating? Is it the rain?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The line to the leach field is clogged. They have known for a while but aren't quick to fix it since it is buried about 4 ft deep and this red clay is hard.

      Delete
  2. Looks like it didn't rain this morning, it poured. Well done, though :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yup, it poured here too and it was just lovely in the pig pen, lol.

      Delete
  3. Life in Suburbia (where I live) is so much easier, by the sound of it... I have to admire your resilience!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't know how resilient I am. I have to keep going, I just have no choice. I'm sure you have your own problems that you deal with just as well...they just might not involve pigs, lol.

      Delete
  4. Oh I feel for you! I've been down that road with the pigs getting out again and again and again. They are so smart and determined- especially once they know where a weak spot is. Eventually our boar would bust through our pallet fence at will (he was 500-600 lbs) and we had to run an electric fence. I will never forget the struggle tho - or the time our boar, sow and one smaller pig all broke out into our small (pull behind camper) trailer we were storing grain in. They barely fit and it was rockin so hard I got outta there for fear it was going to flip. Goodness- hard to believe I miss our pigs and can't wait to get new ones once we find our new land.
    Here's a pic of him at our old farm blog http://plasticpumpkinfarm.wordpress.com/2011/11/18/around-the-farm/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't plan on letting ours get that big.

      Delete
  5. Hi Becky, you just can't trust those pesky pigs. They must have Siberian Husky in them,LOL. Siberians are escape artists. When I have garlic,it doesn't stay around long enough to get braided,LOL.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Had pigs on our farm when I was young.Don't remember them getting away much. They had a little house with 3 sides built very low to the ground that they all squeeze into when it got too warm.We did ride them bronco style,believe me it was only seconds at a time but, we sure had a great time doing it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lol, I am not riding these, though I am sure even with my big body, they could hold me.
      Looks like my pallets worked as they are still in their own pen when I checked them right after I got off work.

      Delete
  7. When I read the title of this post I thought it was about boots (do you have Ugg boots where you are - if not they are essentially calf high boots made from sheep skin with the wool inside). Having read the post I realise its the pigs that need a good kicking (metaphorically of course the pig pen would ruin Ugg boots).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No I have not heard of Ugg boots, sounds nicer than the ones I was wearing though which were made of rubber and covered with ...well you get the idea, lol.

      Delete
  8. What a trial! hope it all works out the way you want!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Well, Phil ended up with most of today off, so he is working on the septic and so far the pigs are still in their pen.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I know from experience that pigs are great escape artists thank goodness they are greedy too or you'd never get them back.

    ReplyDelete
  11. We use livestock panels from Tractor Supply:
    http://www.tractorsupply.com/feedlot-panel-hog-16-ft-l-x-34-in-h-3610325
    They are very heavy gauge wire that are easy to install. We wire them to t-posts or staple them to wood posts. The pigs can't break through them at all. Worth every penny.

    ReplyDelete